CONSTANTLY TERRIFIED

Chris Chappell Photo Column—The Mountain Goats

Going to see the Mountain Goats is like a religious experience for me. They’re a band I hold close to my heart whose live show brings me comfort and excitement.

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Razorcake Podcast #778 with Kurt Morris

All Propagandhi all the time.

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Webcomic #530 by Donna Ramone

Donna doesn't really have anything to plug, but you could always snag a subscription! /// Do you or your friends make webcomics that would fit well here at Razorcake? Send an email (and comics or links to comics) to our editors: [email protected] or [email protected]

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Icepick to the Moon: DVD

Rev. Fred Lane is a genre unto himself. He’s a singer few have ever heard of who inspires deep devotion among the converted. Admittedly, that’s a familiar template, but no one’s ever bent that template quite like Lane. With Icepick to the Moon, director Paul “Skizz” Czykz tells the many-layered story of Fred Lane and […]

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Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The (1985) (2021 re-release)

In 1985, Makoto Tezuka, a twenty-two-year-old film student, directed a zany tribute to films where bands play themselves in fictional situations á la the Beatles’ Help!The Legend of the Stardust Brothers wasn’t seen by anybody outside of Japan until 2018, when it was finally translated and re-released in theaters and eventually on home video. The […]

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Dangerous Visions and New Worlds—Radical Science Fiction, 1950-1985, Edited by Andrew Nette and Iain McIntrye, 216 pgs.

In college, my African-American Literature professor devoted his lessons to an overview of the corpus—we read and wrote about some novels, but the classes were mostly devoted to his summarizing and explaining the significance of works we hadn’t read and weren’t assigned. I questioned (silently) how worthwhile this was, but the dividends of cultural literacy […]

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Forbidden Beat: Perspectives on Punk Drumming, Edited by S.W. Lauden, foreword by Lucky Lehrer, 218 pgs.

When I saw there was a person who endeavored to write about punk drumming, I’ll admit that (as a punk drummer myself) I was equal parts intrigued and skeptical. I wondered how it would hold my attention on a seemingly simple subject. Never have I been so pleased to be proven wrong. Not only did […]

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High Desert, The, By James Spooner, 368 pgs.

James Spooner is a Los Angeles artist and activist who may be best known as director of the documentary Afro-Punk, a film that focuses on the experience of Black punks. Similarly, in the graphic novel The High Desert, Spooner uses his uses his visual art skills to tell the autobiographical story of a young Black […]

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In My Eyes: Photographs 1982-1987 By Jim Saah, 337 pgs.

Jim Saah grew up in the DC area and began photographing punk bands early in the 1980s. Like many of you, I’ve seen various photos taken by him over the years, particularly of seminal DC legends like Minor Threat, though I may not have known at the time they were taken by him. His pictures […]

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In the Pit: Punk Rock Photos - 1981-1991 By Alison Braun, 88 pgs.

I think I first became aware of Ms. Braun's photos in Flipside. I probably did see her work in Maximum Rocknroll as well, but if you were looking to get blown away visually, then Flipside was your ticket because they ran photos larger than MRR, and sometimes even as a two-page spread. There was also […]

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One Hundred Columns for Razorcake By Ben Snakepit, 112 pgs.

Ben Snakepit has been drawing three-panel comics about his day for over twenty years. And despite how mundane or boring his day was, his zines (later turned books) were hard to put down. It’s not that they’re drawn great (Ben is actually a very good illustrator despite what his comics look like or what he […]

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Shadow Cast in Dust, A, By Ben Johnson, 333 pgs.

I tried this one multiple times, but it just didn’t grab me—prose littered with modifiers and unneeded words proved too daunting for me to dive any deeper into the trilogy of “a strange world of wonder and deceit.” Sorry, mang. –Michael T. Fournier (Grand Mal Press, grandmalpress.com)

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