PSIONIC PLASTIC JOY #16: tabloid size, newsprint, $2.00 (U.S.), $3.00 (World), 12 pgs.

I’ve received this paper to review twice before and, if anything, it’s pretty consistently inconsistent. The first time, it was a little too out there for me. The second time, it was the perfect amount of esoteric fringe stuff mixed with relevant radical thought. This time, it’s even more mixed-up. The editor, Jason Rodgers, is an interesting writer and thinker, who I can always appreciate reading. He excels in here with his Luddite anti-internet article and a leftist critique of Harlan County U.S.A, which is probably the most important film ever made. Next, he contradicts his article about why print is crucial by printing two poorly executed articles that will leave readers scratching their heads. Each of these articles assumes way too much of the reader. For instance, there’s a whole newspaper-sized page dedicated to something called Art Detox, which made no sense to me because I have no idea what that is. The author felt no inclination to tell me, either. This is followed by an incoherent, satirical piece about some artist guy named Dash Snow who, apparently, died. I couldn’t figure out whether the dead fucker was real, a mockery of someone real, or entirely fabrication. It’s a bit ironic to print an article about boycotting the internet and then forcing your reader to google the subject matter of the rest of the articles you print (I didn’t). These seriously frustrating excuses for journalism are followed by more bad writing. However, this was of the so-bad-it’s-good variety of paranoid conspiracy theory, which I enjoy in small doses. I had fun reading aloud to my friends the pieces about how there were once giants (or Nephilim) that ran the world who looked like lizards and bred evil into to people by fucking them when they weren’t supposed to (or something like that). This sort of wingnuttery, is immediately followed by an essay written by the always thought-provoking John Zerzan. All of this is laid out on cut ‘n’ paste newsprint and interspersed with some wacky poetry. P/P/J is a fun mish-mash of underground thought—some of it frustratingly bad, some of it hilariously bad, a lot of it pretty damn astute. –Craven Rock (Jason Rodgers,

PO Box 8512, Albany, NY12208)